четверг, 10 октября 2019 г.

Research Paper on Child Behavior

Child Behavior As It Ages Michael Larson English Composition II Ensley Laruth 10/30/2012 Child Behavior As It Ages Many people have studied the effect of academic achievement and later career success. The focus of this paper will be on the work of Greg Duncan of Northwestern University and L Rowell Huesmann of the University of Michigan. These findings can help parents, teachers and behavioral scientists help disruptive students. The study shows that the way children act at a young age will reflect later in life and interfere with their ability to learn. I will also be using information found in five other sources throughout this paper.These sources include information on attachment issues in psychopathology and intervention, history of childhood behavior problems in biological relatives of boys with attention-deficit hyperactive disorder and conduct disorder and BPA tied to behavior problems within girls just to name a few (Atkinson, 2004). Childhood behavior has been slowly deterio rating over the past 28 years since I was a toddler. Growing up in the 80s it was socially acceptable to spank your child and children were taught to respect elders. Now children are oblivious to the respect that parents deserve and everything centers on their own needs.Throughout this paper many things have been explored such as: attachment issues in psychology, history of childhood behavior problems in biological relatives of boys with ADHD and conduct disorder, dealing with disrespect in your teenager, the seven keys to child obedience and how children’s bad behavior gives insight to academic achievements. New Research Suggest â€Å"New research suggests that children entering school with behavior problems, as a rule, can keep pace with classroom learning, but persistent behavior problems can be a strong indicator of how well these students adapt to the work world† (Duncan & Huesmann, 2007  ¶2).With this being said there are two separate studies resulting in t wo separate results when researching kindergartners and younger children compared to adolescents and 8th graders. â€Å"One study examined data from six large-scale studies of almost 36,000 preschoolers in which the same subjects were observed repeatedly over time. The research included two national studies of U. S. children, two multi-site studies of U. S. children, one study of children from Great Britain and one study of children from Canada† (Duncan & Huesmann, 2007  ¶2).There was various research techniques used in finding the results from all of the different studies. â€Å"Surprisingly, difficulty getting along with classmates, aggressive or disruptive behaviors, and sad or withdrawn behaviors in kindergarten did not detract from academic achievement in childhood and early adolescence† (Duncan & Huesmann, 2007  ¶3). There were several indicators studied, including picking fights, interrupting the teacher and defying instructions. Kindergartners that were involved in these acts did surprisingly well in 5th grade math and English, while keeping pace with well behaved children. Another CAPCA study, which examined older children, found such a connection. According to CAPCA investigator Rowell Huesmann, persistent behavior problems in eight-year-olds are a powerful predictor of educational attainment and of how well people will do in middle age† (Duncan & Huesmann, 2007  ¶3). Childhood behavior has been slowly deteriorating over the past 28 years since I was a toddler. Growing up in the 80s it was socially acceptable to spank your child and children were taught to respect elders. Now children are oblivious to the respect that parents deserve and everything centers on their own needs.Children of the current generation are losing the respect and behavior that was drilled into people of past generations. The purpose of this paper is to explain the importance of today’s society to increase awareness on the development of our children’s behavior and also to explain why harsh punishment can get children on track. The intended audience of this paper is current parents and expecting parents. The secondary audience will be future parents of our generation. I will be the voice of parents of our generation and future parents. Dealing With Disrespect In Your TeenagerDisrespect can start small and turn into something much more serious if not tended to. It can become the way the child relates to family and friends; it can even be passed from generation to generation. Most parents do not stop this behavior for fear that it will effect the parent child relationship when they may actually be effecting the way the child relates to people in the future. â€Å"As any parent of a 13-year old  knows, disrespect can be displayed by the roll of their eyes, an arrogant attitude, a sideways look, a turned back, cutting or barbed comments, sarcasm, pouting, or raging.And nowadays, it can include popping in t he iPod ear buds, texting on the cell phone or playing the video game instead listening to a parent† (Gregston, 2010,  ¶ 2). There is no hiding the sting of disrespect when your child shows signs of it and there is no need to point it out to the child because they know exactly what they were doing. The Seven Keys To Child Obedience Learning obedience is an important part of early child development. Obedience is the main tool parents use to train their children.Through obedience your child will use things he or she needs later in adulthood that force obedience upon a child will soon create resentment within their children, which will eventually lead to rebellion. According to Hareyan (2005), â€Å"Although you can punish a child for not obeying, this will not foster any long-term obedience. When the child reaches his teen years and becomes more independent, punishment will only serve to destroy the already faltering parent child relationship†(Hareyan, 2005,  ¶ 2). Th ere are seven steps to getting your child to want to obey you.These steps according to the author are, â€Å" loving concern for the child, sincere respect for the child, patients, speak softly, make moderate demands, follow through and be free with yes but not with no† (Hareyan, 2005,  ¶ 3). History of Childhood Behavior Problems in Biological Relatives â€Å"Frick assessed the history of childhood behavior problems in the biological relatives of over 100 outpatient boys aged 7 to 12 years with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or conduct disorder (CD)† (Frick P, 1991 p1). Frick did this in order to see if these two disorders were something that is hereditary and passed down from relatives. The mothers, fathers, and other biological relatives of children with ADHD were significantly more likely to have a history of childhood ADHD but not problems of antisocial behavior or substance use in their childhood† (Frick P, 1991 pg1). ADHD is something th at can be passed on through relatives but substance use or abuse was not a result of relatives having ADHD. This does not mean there will not be substance use but the study shows that it is not a result of family ADHD. â€Å"Attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity was similarly associated with a family history of ADHD†. On the other hand fathers of children with CD were more likely to have a history of CD and substance abuse, these results didn’t seem to change with the difference in race or social status. These results provide support for the independence of ADHD and CD being a clinical syndrome and not something inherited† (Frick P, 1991 p1). Attachment Issues In Psychopathology The report conducted by Atkinson and Goldberg report reviews and compares empirical findings on attachment and childhood behavior problems in normal, at-risk, and clinical studies.The report concludes that as we move along a continuous risk to clear diagnosis, the likel ihood of attachment decreases and the likelihood of controlling, disorganized, and insecure attachment increase. Because these are normally rare patterns and, in the case of the disorganized and insecure-other categories, not clearly defined strategies, this is consistent with the notion that clinic samples include attachment patterns that fall outside of the established schemes.Further differentiation within these categories based on clinic samples may prove to be more useful than are the normatively derived classification schemes in linking attachment and psychopathology (Atkinson, 2004). Conclusion Throughout this paper many things have been explored such as: attachment issues in psychology, history of childhood behavior problems in biological relatives of boys with ADHD and conduct disorder, dealing with disrespect in your teenager, the seven keys to child obedience and how children’s bad behavior gives insight to academic achievements.With this information parents may ha ve learned some new information about Attention-Deficit Hyperactive Disorder and Conduct Disorder, new ways to handle obedience with your children or the lack of obedience and the seven keys to child obedience. With this information childhood obedience can be improved throughout the world.Reference Atkinson L. & Goldberg S. (2004). Attachment Issues In Psychopathology And Intervention. Duncan, G. , & Huesmann, L. R. (2007, November 26). Children's bad behavior gives insights to academic achievement and later career success. Retrieved from: https://www. nsf. gov/news/news_summ. jsp? rg=NSF;amp;cntn_id=110709;amp;preview=false Frick P. ;amp; Lahey B. ;amp; Christ MA. ;amp; Loeber R. ;amp; Green S. (1991). History of Childhood Behavior Problems in Biological Relatives of Boys With Attention-Deficit Hyperactive Disorder And Conduct Disorder. Gregston M. (2010) Dealing With Disrespect In Your Teenager. Parenting Todays Teen. Retrieved from: file:///Users/michaellarson/Documents/e nglish%20comp%20II/Parent%20Tips%20from%20Mark%20Gregston%20 »%20Dealing%20With%20Disrespect%20In%20Your%20Teenager. webarchive Hareyan A. (2005) The Seven Keys To Child Obedience. EmaxHealth. retrieved from: http://www. emaxhealth. com/20/1788. html

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